Hot Chocolate Flakes - Origins Collection


premium origin hot chocolates

Surely one type of chocolate tastes just like another... No, a huge range of factors have a bearing on the flavour; climate, altitude, soil type, how they are fermented, roasting time, the type of cacao beans used... The list goes on an on.

Below is a selection of our premium hot chocolates that have been chosen from around the world. Each has their own distinctive character and story to tell.

If you want more information on types of cacao beans, then scroll to the bottom of the page for a short guide...


The Collection


extra dark Venezuelan hot chocolate 250g bag

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Venezuelan Hot Chocolate 250g

Venezuela is a country of great contrasts; from its hot and sticky jungles to its icy, snow covered peaks.

Type

Dark

Cocoa Percentage

72%

Beans Used

Criollo & Trinitario

Tasting Notes

Notes of Black Olives with a woody character. A strong cacao taste, bitter and a bit fruity.

Hot Chocolate from Papua New Guinea

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Papua Hot Chocolate 250g

Papua New Guinea is an island just south of the equator. It is known for producing some of the most flavourful cacao beans in the world. The industry in the country supports 150,000 families.

Type

Milk

Cocoa Percentage

35%

Beans Used

Forastero

Tasting Notes

A very creamy chocolate with aromatic notes of hazelnuts and caramel.

extra dark hot chocolate from tanzania

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Tanzanian Hot Chocolate 250g

Tanzania's climate would lead you to believe that cacao trees cannot be grown there. However, there are some small pockets of land where the climate is right and a new industry in the region has popped up.

Type

Dark

Cocoa Percentage

75%

Beans Used

Criollo & Trinitario

Tasting Notes

Rich, acidulous taste with intense bitterness. A peppery aroma with notes of citrus.

Extra dark hot chocolate from Latin America and Africa

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Ecuador, Ivory Coast & Sao Tome Hot Chocolate 250g

Latin America meets Africa... Sao Tome is a tiny island off the coast of Africa, despite its size, in 1913 it was the worlds biggest cacao grower. After Portuguese rule ended, the island's farms fell into decline. However, cacao is making a come back on the island.

Type

Dark

Cocoa Percentage

70%

Beans Used

Arriba & Forastero

Tasting Notes

Bitter cocoa flavour with moderate acidity. Subtle aromas of red fruits, wood, banana and liquorice.

Dark hot chocolate flakes from Mexico

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Mexican Hot Chocolate 250g

Mexico is an ancient land that takes it current name from the Mexica people, who dominated the once mighty Aztec Empire. They loved chocolate so much that they used cacao beans as a currency.

Type

Dark

Cocoa Percentage

66%

Beans Used

Forastero

Tasting Notes

This dark chocolate has hints of cinnamon, liquorice, hazelnut, coffee and gingerbread.

Milk hot chocolate from Java in a 250g bag

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Javan Hot Chocolate 250g

A fusion of Javan, Ghanaian and Ivory Coast cacao beans. Java is an island covered in lush rainforest beneath the ever smoking volcanoes...

Type

Milk

Cocoa Percentage

36%

Beans Used

Criollo & Trinitario

Tasting Notes

An equal balance of cacao and milk with hints of fruit and hazelnuts

Extra dark hot chocolate from the island of Hispaniola

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Hispaniola Hot Chocolate 250g

Hispaniola is a large island in the Greater Antilles archipelago, split into two countries. These beans came from the Dominican Republic on its eastern side.

Type

Dark

Cocoa Percentage

70%

Beans Used

Criollo & Trinitario

Tasting Notes

This chocolate has a rounded, bitter cocoa flavour. Complimented by aromatic notes of spices, olives and wine.

milk chocolate from Ghana in a 250g bag

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Ghana Hot Chocolate 250g

The ancestors of the trees that grew this chocolate were brought to Ghana 1879 from Brazil. They they have flourished in their new home ever since.

Type

Milk

Cocoa Percentage

40%

Beans Used

Forastero

Tasting Notes

A subtle sweetness that is balanced with cocoa aromas with biscuit, honey and caramel.


The Types of Beans


Many factors add up to create the final flavour of the chocolate you consume; however, the most obvious is the type of cacao bean that is used.

There is some disagreement on how many types of cacao tree there are with some saying just three however there are others which have come into existence either naturally or though accidents...

 

Forastero

Forestero or in English, The Stranger, is the workhouse of the chocolate industry. It is a more rugged plant that produces bigger harvests and can survive in a wider range of climates. As a result it accounts for 75% of the world's chocolate crop. It lacks the subtle flavours of the other types of beans so is generally used for making milk chocolate. Other types of beans are used for higher grade dark chocolate, where their individual personalities can show through...

man picking a cacao pod

Criollo

In South America, Criollo means a person of pure Spanish descent in South America.

More importantly for this story; it is also an important type of cacao plant that is native to Venezuela. This is usually the bean of choice for high end chocolate due to its more developed flavour. It is a weaker plant though and it is more expensive to grow. It represents just 3% of global chocolate production. If only there was something that was easier to grow with a good flavour...

 

Trinitario 

In 1727 a hurricane wiped out the Criollo plantations on Trinidad. In a hurry to rebuild, Forastero plants were used to get the farms up and running again. However, not all the Criollo plants were dead and over time the two plants cross pollinated to form a new plant that was fairly hardy but with an improved flavour. Just over 10% of the world's production comes from this plant.

 

Nacional

The rarest of the rare... In the 18th and 19th centuries Nacional was the most coveted chocolate due to its flavour that surpassed Criollo and had a wonderful floral aroma. But in 1916 Witches Broom disease tore through the plantations. Any trees that survived were believed to be hybrids, created by mixing with other types of cacao trees, one of these is the Arriba variant. All the way up to the start of the 21st Century it was considered extinct.

But then... In 2009, six genetically pure trees were found out of a sample of 11,000 trees. This number has risen a little since then but is still very low. Maybe Nacional can be saved, but it is literally just hanging on by a thread.